Constitutional Litigation

There’s no denying that public opinion on the dangerousness of cannabis has changed dramatically in recent years. Florida has not taken the steps that some states have taken to legalize cannabis for medical purposes, let alone for general use. But there’s evidence of a change in public opinion in Florida as well.

Florida has legalized

The Supreme Court of the United States has agreed to step in to resolve a long-running dispute between Florida and Georgia. As noted in my previous post, it is the second Florida case on the Supreme Court’s docket this term that involves Florida’s commercial fishing industry.

Profound economic implications are at stake for each

It is not easy to get the Supreme Court of Florida to hear a case. That is by design: the Florida Constitution was amended in 1980 to curtail the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction so that it may only review a limited number of cases that fall into discrete categories. 

But the Court has a catch-all jurisdictional

Gun rights advocates received a big win in Florida’s First District Court of Appeal on December 10, 2013. The 1st DCA took the unusual step of issuing seven separate opinions to explain the result.

Guns.jpg

Sitting en banc in Florida Carry, Inc. v. University of North Florida, the 1st DCA voted 12-3 to reverse

Florida’s acupuncture physicians and massage therapists recently learned that they are (again) ineligible to be paid PIP benefits for treating automobile accident victims. Chiropractors learned that PIP coverage of their services has (again) been curtailed as well. But the changes may be temporary. 

They resulted from a loss suffered by acupuncture physicians, massage therapists, and

Issuing its opinion in DMT vs. TMH, a closely watched case that drew national attention, the Supreme Court of Florida today declared that a woman has constitutionally protected rights to raise a child created by artificial insemination using her ovum, with the fertilized ovum carried and the child born by her then-committed partner, and

In the past few years, the strangest things have started appearing in appellate decisions: images. That has been seen as so revolutionary that it has been widely covered in the legal press, with 7th Circuit opinions authored by Judge Richard Posner (as is often the case) drawing the most attention. The question is: why