General Civil Litigation

The past few years have shown that litigation continues to be a viable vehicle for bringing about societal change, particularly when legislative action does not follow changes in public opinion on high profile issues. The same sex marriage litigation that culminated in same sex marriage bans being declared unconstitutional in Obergefell v. Hodges is perhaps

Florida commercial fishing industry, meet the Supreme Court of the United States. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear three cases from Florida in its current term, two of which involve commercial fishing.

In the most recently granted case, the state of Florida is set to do battle with the state of Georgia, in

Last week, two federal courts of appeals–the 4th Circuit and D.C. Circuit–considered whether the IRS reasonably interpreted the Affordable Care Act as allowing the IRS to give tax credits to taxpayers that purchase health insurance through an exchange set up by the federal government. Both courts of appeals considered the same statutory text, the same

With the collapse of multiple large scale Ponzi schemes in recent years, Federal courts in Florida and elsewhere have been wrestling with so-called “clawback” suits. The way Ponzi schemes work is that the schemers induce investors to give them money that is supposed to be invested, usually with high returns promised.

But because the promised

U.S. federal courts are characteristically wary of overstepping their bounds when adjudicating cases involving foreign governments or issues and events occuring in foreign countries. That can pose a challenge for U.S. companies engaged in international business, especially with foreign governments. When such business dealings go sour, the ability to enforce contract rights in U.S. courts can

Is a Facebook friendship really a friendship? Can judges be “friends” with attorneys on Facebook? Florida judges and legal ethicists have been debating these questions for more than four years. Florida District Courts of Appeal have now begun to offer their opinions, as Facebook friending has emerged as an issue in motions to recuse trial

It’s not uncommon to see pro se litigants butt heads with trial judges. It’s less common to see attorneys doing so. Knowing that they will likely appear before the same judge in the future, most lawyers take great pains to put aside personal grievances in the interest of protecting their clients, current and future.

One

People make mistakes. Even lawyers. Even judges. We are all human after all, and to be human is to be fallible. In the pressure-packed environment of a trial or hearing, the probability that a mistake will be made is even greater.

Part of the job of an appellate lawyer is to comb through the record