It is not easy to get the Supreme Court of Florida to hear a case. That is by design: the Florida Constitution was amended in 1980 to curtail the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction so that it may only review a limited number of cases that fall into discrete categories. 

But the Court has a catch-all jurisdictional

Gun rights advocates received a big win in Florida’s First District Court of Appeal on December 10, 2013. The 1st DCA took the unusual step of issuing seven separate opinions to explain the result.

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Sitting en banc in Florida Carry, Inc. v. University of North Florida, the 1st DCA voted 12-3 to reverse

Florida’s acupuncture physicians and massage therapists recently learned that they are (again) ineligible to be paid PIP benefits for treating automobile accident victims. Chiropractors learned that PIP coverage of their services has (again) been curtailed as well. But the changes may be temporary. 

They resulted from a loss suffered by acupuncture physicians, massage therapists, and

The Florida Supreme Court justices and District Court of Appeal judges who were up for retention votes this year had a great day yesterday. Congratulations go out to all of the retained justices and appellate judges:

Florida Supreme Court:

Justice R. Fred Lewis

Justice Barbara J. Pariente

Justice Peggy A. Quince

Despite facing organized

So much for easing back to work after the long weekend.  At least for judges in the First District and Fourth District Court of Appeal. 

As the Miami Herald reports, the 1st DCA is hearing consolidated oral argument this afternoon in Florida Gaming Centers, Inc. v. Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, and

Losing at trial hurts. Getting hit with the bill for your adversary’s attorney’s fees makes it hurt ever-so-much more. That’s why fee-shifting under Florida Statutes Section 768.79 — available to parties that make a proposal for settlement under Rule 1.442 — can be such a powerful tool. It’s probably also why lawyers who refuse an

It’s hard to confuse the First District Court of Appeal of Florida (in Tallahassee) with its namesake in California. It’s even harder to confuse with that court’s San Francisco neighbor, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  The 9th Circuit has a reputation (deserved or not) for issuing controversial decisions on hot button issues – often to the displeasure of the U.S. Supreme Court.

The 1st DCA (of Florida) has no such reputation. So some might be surprised by the outcome of two recent worker’ compensation appeals (the 1st DCA has jurisdiction over all workers’ compensation appeals). In recent weeks, the 1st DCA has handed down decisions in two separate cases affirming the right of immigrants working in the U.S. illegally to receive workers’ comp benefits.

In the first of those decisions, HDV Construction Systems, Inc. v. Aragon, No. 1D10–6401 (handed down on June 28, 2011), the 1st DCA held that an employer was on the hook for permanent total disability (PTD) benefits for an unauthorized worker because it knew or should have known that he could not work legally in the U.S., but continued to employ him anyway until he was permanently injured.

In the second, Garcia-Lopez v. Affordable Plumbing/Vinings Insurance Company, No. 1D10–4949 (issued on July 18, 2011), the 1st DCA required an employer to cover workers’ comp benefits for a Mexican immigrant (employed through a third party with knowledge of his status) who was underage in addition to lacking authorization to work in the U.S., rejecting the argument that he could only be compensated for lost income if he proved that he reported his income to the IRS.

What happened?  Has the ideological outlook of San Francisco overtaken Tallahassee?! I don’t think so, as I’ll explain below.


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The Florida Supreme Court’s precedential decision last Thursday in Kaaa v. Kaaa, No. SC09-967, could make life a bit more complicated Florida family lawyers.  Just what you needed, I’m sure!

The Court denied a petition for rehearing, and revised its September opinion, in an attempt to clarify a pretty confusing discussion.  The basic holding